“Tři oříšky pro Popelku” (English title “Three Wishes for Cinderella” [1973]) — created jointly by the film industries of the former Czechoslovakia and former East Germany, easily one of the most successful of Czech films as far as export is concerned, a Christmas classic — features Švihov castle, south of Plzeň in Czech Republic

Keywords: Architecture, Bohemia, Castles, Castles and Fortresses, Central Europe, Czech Culture, Czech film, Czech History, Czech Republic, Czechoslovakia, Europe, History, South Bohemia

Originally owned by the powerful noble house of Rýzmberk, the castle’s present appearance dates to a rebuilding that took place in the late 15th and early 16th centuries following the Hussite Wars.

That reconstruction was overseen by prominent architect of the time, Benedikt Rejt. Following the reconstruction, the castle was the most important and well fortified of its type in Bohemia. Consisting of inner and outer sections as well as two moats, it would have taken a very determined and well equiped adversary to stand a chance of successfully laying seige to it.

The castle changed hands in 1548. However, due to poor management, the House of Říčany who had purchased it were forced to sell it just fifty years later. The castle’s last noble owners, the venerable and prominent Czernin family, held the castle from 1598 until it was seized by the state following the Second World War.

https://beyondprague.wordpress.com/2020/04/13/svihov-castle-popelkas-palace

Vitoria Gasteiz is a modern city with a medieval uptown, my favorite area to be honest: viewed from the sky, this area has the form of an almond, thanks to the Santa Maria cathedral, surrounded by streets that converge to her from both sides

Keywords: caderno, fotografia, geografia, literatura, photography, tradições, travels, viagens

But don´t worry, if you´re not into religion, there´s a lot to do and to see in the city. One of my favorite activities was to discover the local street art. Vitoria Gasteiz has an impressive collection of murals, thanks to an initiative called ‘La Ciudad Pintada’ (‘The Painted City’). It was hard to decide my favorite one…

https://worldwidepedrol.com/2020/02/29/vitoria-gasteiz-heart-basque-country

While a lot of China is being modernized, the Great Wall is an everlasting legacy of an ancient time where construction of such a huge military barricade almost seems impossible

Keywords: China , Great Wall , hiking , Great Wall of China , hiking in China , Jiankou , Mutianyu

When arriving in Beijing, we both knew a must-do was to spend one of our three days exploring the nearby sections of the Great Wall of China, as arguably the wall is the most iconic monument in all of China. Having learned about how the Great Wall was built as protection from the northern Mongol invaders as a high-schooler, I was giddy with excitement to finally get my first chance to see this colossal feat in person – I mean come on it spans 13,170 miles (21,196 kilometers)!

https://themarridlife.com/2020/02/17/jiankou-to-mutianyu-great-wall-hike

DAY -2, Birla Institute of technology and Science, Pilani (Rajasthan).

categorized , event , travel blogger , travel blog , outfit , lifestyle

thatfashionfads

I have visited famous places in Pilani. That are :-

Built by the famous industrialist and philanthropist G.D. Birla, Shradha Temple (also known as Birla Temple) is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Pilani. Dedicated to Goddess Saraswati, Shradha Temple is an epitome of beauty and articraft. Made of white marble, the exterior of shrine has multiple figures of saints, scientists as well as philosophers showing a beautiful combination of science with spirituality.

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It is believed that Panchvati is the place where Ram along with Sita and Lakshman resided during his Vanwaas. It is a major tourist attraction in Pilani. Panchvati is situated in a large area covered with huge tress, shrubs, and bushes giving the impression of a forest and maintained by Birla Trust in Pilani.

Shiv Ganga is highly popular among locals, students and tourist alike. Situated in the heart of Vidya Vihar campus at…

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A day in Belém

belem , belem tower , jeronimos monastery , lisbon , national coach museum , padrao do descobrimentos , ponte 25 de abril , portugal , travel

Bluenose Traveler

About thirty minutes by tram to the west of central Lisbon is Belém, a lovely locale we based part of a day around during our trip back in October. Belém is not for the faint of heart if you are unnerved by crowds. In the morning, cruise ships disembark and a never-ending line of tour busses congregate outside of its most popular sites. For our first stop, we avoided the crowds and visited the National Coach Museum. The collection of historical carriages here was amazing, and seeing so many in one place let us see the progression of “technology”, if you can call it that. I never really thought of carriages before, but loved the unique focus of this museum.

National Coach Museum

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Seville Cathedral in Spain

architecture, cathedral, cityscape, Europe, explore, gothic, photography, seville, Spain, travel, wanderlust

Living The Q Life

When visiting Seville in Spain, the Catredal de Santa Maria de la Sede, better known as the Seville Cathedral, will certainly be one of the top locations on your itinerary. It is certainly a beautiful, gothic cathedral and is one of the largest churches in the world. Just walking around and through the church is certainly worth spending an hour or two at the cathedral, but going to the top of the Giralda, or bell tower, should absolutely be part of your visit. The views of the city of Seville from the cathedral’s bell tower are absolutely stunning.

IMGP3775 Impressive Size of the Cathedral

DSC02566 View of the Guadalquivir River

DSC02560 Organ Pipes

IMGP3778 Over Looking the Alcázar Palace

IMGP3780 The Giraldi or Bell Tower

As you approach the cathedral, you will likely be approached by gypsy women offering you bundles of herbs or flowers. If you accept them, you will immediately be expected to…

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In Waterbury, a sip of Conn.

Bulfinch Award, Bulfinch Awards, Cathy Leonard Czepiel, Christopher Wigrem, Connecticut, Connecticut Architecture, DeCarol & Doll, ICAA, Michael Tyrrell, The Daily Nutmeg, Urban Planning, Waterbury City Hall, Waterbury CT

Architecture Here and There

Screen Shot 2019-01-24 at 2.52.14 PM.png Statehouse of Connecticut in Hartford. (Connecticut Architecture)

Next Wednesday I’ll be visiting Waterbury, Conn., for the first time in a great many years, and even then I did not visit but passed through. For a New Englander (by choice, not by birth) I have relatively little experience of the Nutmeg State, most of it whizzing by along the coast from the windows of Amtrak. Its countryside has always charmed this urbanist more than its big cities. Its smaller cities, Waterbury, Danbury, Bristol, New Britain, and towns such as Putnam, Pomfret and others along Route 44 and roads beyond I am more familiar with from trips long ago to see relatives in Springfield, Mass. My editor at the Providence Journal, Bob Whitcomb, once dragged me to Stonington, across the Pawcatuck from Westerly. He figured he’d surprise me with its beauty – and he did. It was lovely. I was…

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